Conflation can be hazardous to your health

I have it on good authority that conflating Special Forces with Special Olympics in the presence of a half dozen or so Spec Ops people has the potential to be hazardous to your health.

The person who tested this hypothesis told me he was concerned he might be killed for couple of minutes. He managed to talk his way out of the situation without injury but does not recommend others attempting to repeat the experiment.

To the best of my knowledge the reverse conflation has not been tested. I would like to suggest this is a new field ripe for original research with a lower potential for health hazards.

What the AR in AR-15 really means

Some ignorant anti-gun people seem to think the AR in AR-15 means “Assault Rifle”. Some trolls deliberately say that just to get people worked up and to waste their time.

I’d like to definitely set the issue to rest with this post. The AR in AR-15 does not mean “Assault Rifle”.

Here, for present day applications, is the definitive definition of what AR means (given appropriate legal constraints):

AntifaRemover-15

H/T to Phoenix‏ @Phoenix81977532.

Valid points

Liberals Unable To Pass Background Checks Necessary To Buy The Guns They’ll Need To Take Guns Away From Law-Abiding Gun Owners is satire, but most of the points are completely valid. For example:

“And I know it’s gonna work,” Harris said, “because we’ll be taking guns away from law-abiding citizens. Obeying the law is what they do. It’s not like we’re trying to take guns out of the hands of criminals.”

Quote of the day—The Babylon Bee

Democrats have made vows to place extreme restrictions on guns, but they keep running into a problem: Many of their ideas can’t go into effect because of an early addendum to the Constitution. They’re now calling this the “Second Amendment loophole.”

“We just want to get guns off the streets,” Cory Booker, one of 583 presidential candidates, told the press, “but this Second Amendment loophole makes it so we can’t do that. We need to close that loophole.”

The way many gun control advocates would like things to work is, if they read in the New York Times about a particular gun model they think is scary–like an AR-15 or a semi-automatic or a glue gun–they could then just go ahead and ban it and start taking it from people. Normally things would work this way with anything else, but thanks to the Second Amendment loophole, they can’t just ban guns because they feel like it.

The Babylon Bee
Democrats Vow To Close Dangerous Gun-Buying Loophole Known As ‘The Second Amendment’
June 17, 2019
[Via a text message from daughter Jaime.

There is so much truth and enough non-truth, which could be a deliberate lie in real life, you have think about this some before concluding it is satire.—Joe]

Pencil control

Via a retweet by SAF (@2AFDN on Twitter) we have this from @SandraSentinel:

PencilBadGrades

It’s logically consistent. Therefore, if you are in support of banning guns to stop violent crime you must also be in support of banning pencils to stop people from getting bad grades. You may have already observed this but they do not follow this course of action.

One must therefore conclude that the reason for their desire for banning guns has nothing to do with the stated goal of reducing violent crime. It must be something else such as a desire to control people.

Another alternative which has legitimate application in many cases is that anti-gun people do not confine themselves to logical thought processes. One Marxist professor I talked with even express pride of being able to break free of such constraints.

Markley’s Law response

I got a chuckle out of this (via November Papa Charlie @rcst) as a potential response to someone exercising Markley’s Law:

ConservativeWomen

I’m not so thrilled about the statement in absolute terms. There are lot of other advantages I would rate just as high from associating with women who aren’t social justice warriors.

Truth

Via someplace on Facebook:

YOU KNOW YOU ARE FROM WASHINGTON STATE WHEN:

You know the Vitamin d deficiency struggle is real.

You know how to pronounce Sequim, Puyallup, Sammamish, Enumclaw and Issaquah.

You avoid driving through Seattle at all costs.

You know what a Geoduck is.

You consider swimming an indoor sport.

You see a person carrying an umbrella and instantly think tourist.

Your lawn is mostly moss and you don’t really care.

Honking your car horn is for absolute emergencies.

You’re EXTREMELY picky about your coffee.

“The mountain is out today”, isn’t a strange statement.

While out of state you just tell people you’re from Seattle since that’s the only known city in Washington according to the rest of the world.

You remember Almost Live.

You’ve eaten in the Space Needle, and while it was delicious, you’re never paying $50 for a meal in the sky again.

You rarely wash your car because it’s just going to get washed by the rain tomorrow.

You’re used to the phrase “No, not DC” when telling out of staters where you’re from.

Northface is always in fashion.

You take a warm coat and a hat with you for a day at the beach.

You have mastered the art of doing everything in the rain, because, well, Washington.

You play the “no you go” at four-way stop.

You have had both the thought of how beautiful Mount Rainier is, while simultaneously accepting that it will probably kill you someday.

You get a little twitchy if it’s been more than a week since it last rained.

You believe Twilight ruined Forks.

You can say Humptulips, Lilliwap and Dosewallips without giggling.

Add Mukilteo, Snohomish, and Snoqualmie to the list of places you can pronounce correctly. And in Barb’s case she fought Moss War 2015, and finally won in 2016.

Quote of the day—RussianBot (@JamesWSchuler)

When you consider that most people figure out how to ask a question before leaving grade school, yet journalism is almost entirely populated by people who needed an additional four years of secondary education to crack that nut, it all makes sense.

RussianBot (@JamesWSchuler)
Tweeted on November 30, 2018
[It’s not entirely true, but it has a strong leaning in the direction of truth.—Joe]

Overheard at work

Some of my teammates and I were discussing the details of an email we got from someone who claimed they had been hacked. It had a number of conclusions which were absurd on their face and the data they supplied were consistent with an alternate hypothesis which was void of any wrongdoing. Yet, we were inclined to look into it a little bit more…

Joe: What they are saying doesn’t make any sense but it’s all within the realm of standard ignorance.

Caity: I like that phrase, “Within the realm of standard ignorance.” Can I be Queen of the Realm?