Quote of the day—Chet

Down through history there has been a number of financial mass hysteria periods as well as political mass hysteria periods. And now we a living through another one.

It did not appear out of the blue. It’s been building over the last four years and even earlier. The warning signs have been around for some time with smaller manias including SJW, Orange Man Bad, Me Too, White Privilege, BLM, the 1619 project and, of course, Guns are Evil – all taking hold and gaining acceptance.

Now we’re canceled! And many on our side are rushing towards the non-existent exits. The questions I have are how deep and wide will this one be? Is there anything that can pop this mass mania that has even a moderate chance of success?

As it became clear that Biden was going to take office, I thought about my guns, taxes, and policies that I object to. I’m now concerned that it is going to be far worse.

Chet
Comment to Quote of the day—Rick Klein
[I’m reminded of a show I used to watch, La Femme Nikita. In the show “canceled” was an euphuism for assassinated or executed.—Joe]

Ghosts of the Constitution, past, present, and future

Yesterday I posed this quote from someone:

The constitution is the conservative equivalent of a gun-free zone.

I followed up with this deliberately very open ended question:

Now, can we use that insight and turn it into what needs to be done next?

The comments indicated everyone took a much narrower view of things than I had. One even took bizarre break from reality saying that my post meant I, “decided to go full-on Brownshirt/Blackshirt/Silvershirt” regarding the election. What? I wasn’t even talking about the election. How did they get there? Did they think they were able to read my mind through the Internet? That was really weird.

Here is what actually happened.

When I read the quote it was like first few nanoseconds of the big bang. Out of nothing there exploded a whole universe. It was like how some people describe their first LSD experience. I’ve never used LSD so I wouldn’t know for certain but that is my best analogy for how it affected me.

There were three comments (here, here, and here) which accurately touched an extremely small fraction of that universe that I saw unfold. And it was all about the past and the present. I was hoping for something more about the future as I was pretty sure I had explored enough of the past and present and satisfied myself that there wasn’t a whole lot more to be learned from those domains. I could be wrong about that so I present that part of my expanding universe for comments, corrections, and additional observations.

But what I really want is for people to think about and suggest a solution to the problem that can be implemented in the near future.

The Past

The authors of the constitution could have set up a separate branch of government which had the job of enforcing the adherence to the original intent. If not this then at least explicitly given the Federal courts some independent enforcement capability and protection from court packing. This may not have been practical or even possible but an attempt in this direction might have made some difference.

This attempts to address the issue, as McChuck, in the comments said, “The Constitution failed because it had no “OR ELSE” clause.”

At numerous critical times there were fairly clear cut issues before the courts which probably, at least a simple majority of people decided the Constitution was inadequate for the present circumstances. And rather than go the long route and get an amendment to the constitution through the process the courts allowed a short cut. This short cut was then used for things not nearly so clear cut. The short cut became a super highway with no restrictions.

I haven’t done the research but a couple very early, reasonably well known examples of such “clear cut issues” were the Lewis and Clark expedition and the Louisiana Purchase. Where does the constitution allow that in it’s enumerated powers?

There are probably hundreds if not thousands of case where little short cuts were taken over the centuries and they enabled all kinds of criminal trespass on the constitution.

What if, instead of politicians and judges instead of giving these short cuts a blind eye, they had handled it differently? What if they had said, “I think this is a good idea. I think this is within to domain of proper government power. BUT, it is also outside of the powers granted to the government”? Let’s, as rapidly as is practical, push through a narrowly scoped constitutional amendment to address this “clear cut issue”. This would have at least attempted to prevent the short cut from becoming a superhighway.

But the politicians of the time didn’t see, didn’t care, or wanted the superhighway and neither of those things happened.

The Present

The U.S. government debt is almost $28 trillion with $159 trillion in unfunded liabilities and constantly going up. Had the original intent of the U.S. constitution been adhered to that could not have happened. The superhighway of criminal trespass on the constitution is is a superhighway to disaster.

The criminal trespass on our personal liberties are just as gargantuan as the economic disaster. The First, Second, and Fourth enumerated rights in the Bill of Rights may have the most lanes of the superhighway over them but all of them, with the possible exception of the Third Amendment, have been paved over with at least a bike path clearly marked where there was once a tall fence with no gate and a NO TRESPASSING sign on it.

People who believe the constitution should be respected according to original intent started talking with each other. The Internet made it far easier to connect with others of a similar mindset. They realize, “Not only is the government infringing upon our rights, the courts aren’t coming to our aid.”

The criminals see the Internet chatter and see erosion of their voting base as more people come up to speed on the situation. The criminals shadow ban people. They freeze their accounts for a day or a week. Then they start completely banning people.

This couple was completely banned by Facebook and they have little* to no idea what it was about. A few weeks later they were both banned within minutes of each other from Instagram. All they posted on Instagram were family pictures. No explain was given. No appeal was possible.

Other people have received some clues. And it’s over the tiniest of stuff:

They are making every post of mine with #DontCaliforniaMyTexas as hate speech and deleting it. I got one day in jail for it

In the last week it was the President of the United States who permanently banned from Twitter. Shortly after POTUS moved to Parler, Apple, Google, and Amazon in a matter of just a few days deplatformed their apps and then the entire site. Poof! Gone! The company is possibly permanently destroyed.

Yesterday morning AR15.com was booted from GoDaddy (see also here). They are now back up on AWS Amazon. I wonder how long that will last as AWS Amazon was the host for Parler.

The political left is saying, “It’s time..” and “Cleansing the movement…” is next.

“Maybe they are being hyper sensitive to people of any political persuasion”, you suggest. It doesn’t look like that to me and others:

Big Tech did not remove House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s accounts when she called for “uprisings” against the Trump administration. Facebook and Twitter did not target Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez when she claimed that allegedly marginalized groups have “no choice but to riot.” These platforms did not act against Kamala Harris when she said the riots “should not” stop.

This week, Joe Biden condemned the Capitol rioters, saying, “What we witnessed yesterday was not dissent, it was not disorder, it was not protest. It was chaos. They weren’t protesters, don’t dare call them protesters. They were a riotous mob, insurrectionists, domestic terrorists. It’s that basic, it’s that simple.”

Yet he refused to speak in those terms when Black Lives Matter and antifa militants were throwing Molotov cocktails at federal buildings, setting up “autonomous zones,” and burning down cities. Instead, he condemned Trump for holding up a Bible at a church — without mentioning the fact that that very church had been set on fire the night before.

What makes you think it will end with social media? What if the political left pulls your Internet connection for some flimsy excuse, or none at all? You think that would be going too far because Internet is essentially a requirement of life these days? Really? You think that would stop them? Do you think I am extrapolating way out into never-never land? “That can’t happen here?”

What if banks refused to do business with you. Wouldn’t that be worse than pulling your Internet connection? Guess what…The Obama administration was telling banks, “If you do business with risky customers, such as gun manufactures or dealers, you will suffer the consequences.” It was called Operation Choke Point.

What about other services such as FedEx, UPS, USPS, your water, waste disposal, and electricity? They didn’t “censor” you, you can still print a newsletter or hold a sign up on the street corner, right? And as long as it wasn’t a government entity refusing you service it’s entirely legit, right?

It used to be motels, restaurants, gasoline stations, etc. could, and did, refuse service to people based on their own criteria. There was a Federal law passed which prohibited such discrimination when it was based on the grounds of “race, color, religion, or national origin.” But it doesn’t protect you if you happen to be one of those nasty people who believe the constitution means what it says.

Do not be surprised if there aren’t soon “blacklists” that result in a surprising number of restrictions on what we normally consider public services. Don’t think so? Today Senator Chuck Schumer called for authorities to add the Capitol rioters to a national no-fly list.

The net result of this? Individual constitutionalists are, metaphorically, standing on some random street corner holding up homemade signs saying, “Repent! The End is Near!” Thousands of criminals occasionally glance at the “Gun-free zone” sign as they zoom by on the nearby superhighway at 100+ MPH and snicker.

The comparisons to the early days of what is described in Gulag Archipelago are eerie. Have a chat with someone with Venezuela, or East Germany sometime.

The Future

This is where I was/am hoping to get some discussion. How can we regain a limited government and our personal liberties?

An armed rebellion? Maybe. But I’m not seeing that as a high probability path. I could see that bringing down the government. But I don’t see that as necessarily building a consensus for the resurrections of limited government rising from the ashes. And your going to start your own cancel culture with a scoped rifle? And how does that work out? You shoot every politician with a ‘D’ beside their name? Then what? Hold another election with the same people voting (and/or cheating) as last time?

And at what point to you start shooting? Are you justified in shooting if you get booted off Facebook or Twitter? And who would you shoot if you somehow managed to convince yourself it was justified? Who do you shoot if some anonymous bureaucrat told your bank to stop doing business with you?

What’s the path to victory here? I am a details oriented guy and as I dig into the details I’m not seeing a viable path.

There is the Lyle option, as I like to think of it. A (supposed) return to Protestant values. This is, perhaps, due to the Second Coming—this isn’t entirely clear to me. I largely dismiss this, not just because I don’t believe in the existence of god(s) but because if the constitution was originally divinely inspired then why did it go so terrible wrong and how can we expect to be better the second time around?

The best I have been able to come up with is that we are probably headed for a Minsky Moment and/or a currency crisis in the somewhat near future. This could be a worldwide event and it could involve the collapse of our currency and perhaps our government. Perhaps out of the ashes of the collapse a more constrained government will have more appeal and will rise.

I see this second option as more probable of success, but still improbable, because the government size proved to be its own downfall rather than being brought down by individualist rebels. Clear and positive proof of big government failure is probably required to convince a majority of people to try small government again.

What I don’t see is a high probability of success path that can be traversed by a few people on the street corners with their handmade signs.

Please discuss.


* Barron recently told me, “I may have been tagged because I didn’t use the complete spelling of my last name.” Yet I know people who have been using completely, and pretty obviously, fake names for their Facebook accounts for years.

Quote of the day—Rick Klein

Trump will be an ex-president in 13 days. The fact is that getting rid of Trump is the easy part. Cleansing the movement he commands is going to be something else.

Rick Klein
Political Director @ABC
Tweeted on January 7, 2021 then deletedRickKlien
[Via email from Drew who also asks:

Now, do you think the cleansing will happen before or after the common sense gun safety buyback registration law is passed?

I really don’t know the answer to that question. But at this time it appears the political left is a little too eager.—Joe]

Quote of the day—BJ Campbell

How on earth is any of this possible? It certainly doesn’t fit the “it’s the guns” narrative. If it were “the guns,” then these hot spots would mostly overlap. There are a few overlaps (sorry Shreveport, sorry Coal Country) but most of the country exhibits the exact opposite behavior than we would expect from the “it’s the guns” hypothesis.

At this point, we’re inclined towards a simple explanation. Poor black folks have a gun homicide problem, while poor white folks have a gun suicide problem.

BJ Campbell
December 22, 2019
Geographic Evidence that Gun Deaths are Cultural
[Via brother Doug.

There is a lot more interesting information to pull from this article but it doesn’t lend itself to extracting an easy quote.—Joe]

Quote of the day—Joshua Eaton

Almost everyone agrees that the ATF is in trouble. But this obscure federal agency may be President-elect Joe Biden’s best chance at having a real impact on gun policy—if he takes the opportunity to restore the beleaguered agency’s reputation and revive its mission. In fact, experts told The New Republic that the ATF may be Biden’s best bet at leaving a mark on federal gun policy without having to rely on an intransigent Congress.

Joshua Eaton
December 25, 2020
This Beleaguered Federal Agency Is America’s Best Hope to Curb Guns
[I find it very telling the author and people quoted in the article don’t even suggest there might be something wrong with restrictions on a specific enumerated right. Let alone making such changes without going through the legislative process.

This is literally the encouragement of a single politician to be a tyrant and restrict the rights of hundreds of millions of people who have a written guarantee their rights would not be infringed.

Such people, and the tyrants they help create, should be prosecuted.—Joe].

Quote of the day—David Codrea

Why citizens wanting to know what the rules are even had to ask – and why that was being evaded – only becomes clear when you come to grips with the obvious: ATF knows it doesn’t have a consistent set of standards by which to apply its evaluations. And it’s not like everyone hasn’t been aware of the problem for a long time.

David Codrea
December 23, 2020
ATF Rules Capricious, Arbitrary, Political, and Stupid
[I have nothing to add.—Joe]

Quote of the day—Kevin Maxwell

In my legal opinion the Rare Breed Triggers FRT is a perfectly legal, semi-automatic, drop-in trigger. And my opinion is further supported by the opinions of whom I believe to be two of the most significant subject matter experts in the industry.

Rare Breed Triggers FRT – Full Video from RARE BREED TRIGGERS on Vimeo.

Kevin Maxwell
December 2, 2020
[As Greg said in a private post on Facebook:

pretty genius, I doubt it will last long on the market.

If you’re into this type of fun then get them while they last!

FRT is an acronym standing for “Forced Reset Trigger”. And that tells you all you need to know to have your giggle box kicked over.

We live in interesting times.—Joe]

Quote of the day—Alex Woodward

Mr Biden’s platform includes a proposed ban of AR-style rifles and high-capacity magazines as well as implementing universal background checks, closing “loopholes” allowing gun sales to at-risk individuals, and hold gun manufacturers accountable for their products – all of which are expected to face uphill battles from a GOP-dominated Congress and legal challenges from a ruthless gun lobby.

Alex Woodward
December 14, 2020
Joe Biden pledges ‘common sense’ gun control on anniversary of Sandy Hook massacre
[“Ruthless gun lobby”?

Bias? What bias?—Joe]

Quote of the day—Tom Luongo

The arguments against the electoral college are simply veiled arguments against Federalism. And while I’m happy to entertain arguments against any coercive form of government, in the case of the U.S. our Federal system is a flawed but robust system which has given ground slowly to these political terrorists over the past couple hundred years.

It is in a terminal state of collapse today and the odds are long that it will survive these challenges in any practical sense.

Tom Luongo
December 9, 2020
Less Electoral College? No, More Electoral College
[I don’t see them as veiled. And not arguments either. More like threats or, on really bad days, telling us this is how they plan to execute us.

I just hope we have enough strength of character to exercise our veto power if it comes down to that.—Joe]

Quote of the day—Stephen Michael Stirling

Which is why vaccination should be compulsory, unless there’s independently-corroborated medical reasons for not taking it.

And by “compulsory” I don’t mean fines and scolding; I mean the cops will come to your house and physically hold you and your family down while the shot is administered, and if you resist beat you to a pulp or shoot you.

Stephen Michael Stirling
Posted on Facebook December 12, 2020
[Via a private post by Jonathan.

Best response (also private) by Vector Victor:

“Alexa, vacuum the doormat.”

I find it interesting so many people are so casual about advocating egregious violation of basic human rights.

We live in interesting times.—Joe]

Quote of the day—David Kopel

China’s Cultural Revolution began to end in 1976 when Mao died, and the pragmatic totalitarians staged a coup that removed the more idealistic totalitarians. Will the people of the Anglosphere have to wait that long, or longer, for rescue? Or will the hundreds of millions of people who don’t support the totalitarian ultra-left emancipate themselves from mental slavery? Will they end the reign of terror of today’s Maoists?

David Kopel
December 11, 2020
The Cult of Mao 1966 v. 2020
[Good questions.

We live in interesting times.—Joe]

Quote of the day—Paul Rosenberg

Another case whose settlement should be announced soon involves another gun industry loophole custom-made for the “bad guy with a gun”:  replica antique black powder guns (that are nonetheless fully functional). Collectively, what these cases show is how deeply dishonest the “good man with a gun” rhetoric really is. It’s not that such people don’t exist. But they’re not the people the NRA and the gun industry have been looking out for.

Quite the contrary: They’ve been used as human shields to fend off gun safety activists and reasonable regulation, while the “bad man with a gun” demographic has been catered to for decades, as the body count continues to grow. With the NRA in crisis and the industry’s PLCAA bulwark teetering, the time is ripe for a historic, responsibility-focused shift in gun policy. And the fact that Congress is still paralyzed no longer matters all that much. Change is coming anyway.

Paul Rosenberg
December 5, 2020
Real gun reform without Congress: Lawsuits demolish the “good guy with a gun”
[We may have some rough times ahead of us.—Joe]

Quote of the day—Ermiya Fanaeian

The left’s idea of a ‘gun nut’ typically is white men who are upper class and see this as a hobby that will make their egos bigger. But the reality is this is a form of empowerment for me.

As working-class people, we should not be disarmed. There is everlasting violence against LGBTQ people that oftentimes politicians, on whatever side of the aisle, are not addressing, and we need to be able to protect ourselves.

And because of that, I came to this understanding that the March for Our Lives goals do not align with my goals.

Ermiya Fanaeian
November 28, 2020
Huge Utah gun control advocate flips, launches a pro-gun group after her ‘awakening’ about America
[The truth will set you free.—Joe]

Quote of the day—Kyle Smith

The Chump Effect is Meigs’s clever term for the bipartisan, broadly shared feeling that various systems are rigged in favor of elites, insiders, and favored groups, which leads to a breakdown in societal trust and trust in institutions. If those guys don’t have to play by the rules, we think, why should I? Meigs delves into social-science experiments that show people motivated by the Chump Effect can act irrationally by effectively volunteering to pay a cost in order that others be punished for ignoring norms.

The political implications of the Chump Effect are obvious: Meigs begins with the story of a man who asked Elizabeth Warren if he, who scrimped to put his child through college, would be entitled to a refund under her proposed new system to forgive student loans. “Of course not,” was Warren’s response. The man was furious: He was being made a chump.

Kyle Smith
November 12, 2020
The Chump Effect
[Emphasis added.

The Chump Effect is a significant component of why socialism and communism always fail.

The politicians don’t abide by state or U.S. Constitutions let alone the laws they pass. Why should they expect others to abide by their laws and regulations?–Joe]

Quote of the day—Alien

It is very rare indeed that one gets to witness a completely naked individual walk up to a large hornet’s nest and begin striking it with a stick after handcuffing himself to the tree the nest is in.

I’m reminded of that line from the movie, “I’m not locked in here with you, you’re locked in here with me.”

Alien
December 1, 2020
Comment to Quote of the day—Republican state lawmakers in Pennsylvania
[I’m not so sure it’s as clear cut as that. But, still, we certainly do live in interesting times.—Joe]

Quote of the day—BLM Activist

You can’t talk about education, and you can’t talk about black issues, and LGBT issues, and exclude them as if they’re some individual issue; you need to be looking at this using intersectionality.

It means recognizing that there is one common enemy: the white man. The systems that they use are capitalism, patriarchy, and fascism. They were created and perpetuated by white men, for white men, in the interests of white men.

And once we realize that we are all fighting the same fight, it just strengthens the army. A problem shared is a problem halved. Imagine if we all realized and came together and grouped together?

All of these groups of people, the issues they face, it all comes from the same people: white men. So we need to get rid of them.

BLM Activist
July 19, 2020
Exclusive Video: BLM Activist Says White Men Are ‘The Common Enemy’, ‘We Need to Get Rid of Them’
[Lesson learned from the 20th Century: If someone says they want to kill an entire class of people… Believe them! Then respond appropriately.—Joe]

Quote of the day—Concerned American

if/when Trump’s legal remedies do not prevail over the Reds’ efforts, the America of your youth has been conquered in full by the Communists.

Concerned American
November 24, 2020
The Crisis Is Here
[While I understand the concern, I’m not in complete agreement it’s game over.—Joe]

Quote of the day—Dennis McBride

Guns have no place in shopping malls or other places in which crowds of people gather. Mayfair has a strict no-gun policy. If the shooter had complied with that policy, no one would have been hurt yesterday.

Dennis McBride
Mayor of Wauwatosa, Wisconsin
November 21, 2020
Wauwatosa Mayor: “Guns have no place in shopping malls”
[It’s as if he believes the gun caused the shooting while the human pulling the trigger was an unwilling participant.

Via Tom Greshm @Guntalk who had this to say:

New Leader in “Dumbest Statement By Elected Official” category. GFZ fail.

Yup. Incredibly dumb. At first I thought it had to be some live response to a question or something. I could see someone saying something like that while under some stress in a live situation. But no. This was a written statement released from the Mayor’s office.

The stupid, or perhaps chutzpah, really runs deep in these people.—Joe]

Quote of the day—long-legged socialist @goodchillhunti1

Generally speaking, I believe re-education camps are a good thing. But we don’t need to send 75 million people there.

I simply propose we abolish private prisons, abolish the military industrial complex, and use the existing infrastructure to re-educate the capitalist class members who won’t relinquish their position of ownership.

long-legged socialist @goodchillhunti1
Tweeted on November 19 and November 20, 2020
[What is the Greek for “Come and take me” (to your re-education camp)?—Joe]

Food for thought

From a comment to a private post on Facebook (slightly edited):

I just don’t understand the antis: The USSR created and started cranking out the PPS-42 in a city under active seige, with krauts within shooting distance of the machinists.

They then took those submachineguns and skulldragged said krauts all 1,086 miles back to Berlin.

What are the antis trying to say? That they’ll be more jackbooted and effective than the Nazis?

Is that what they’re saying? Because that’s not a good look.

Interesting point.

I suspect the antis think gun owners will comply with any law passed or regulation written.