Imagine the implications

Last week Ry came into my office and told me of an article he had read.

This is the “money quote”:

When the four molecules key to the smell of rose were combined with an olfactory white mixture, the rose smell was effectively obscured — showing that olfactory white could be used to mask odours, from the smell of public toilets to that of cocaine or explosives.

If that works on dogs as well as human the implications are very interesting.

4 thoughts on “Imagine the implications

  1. Let the Air Freshener Patent Wars begin! Soon, smugglers and terrorists will be able to protect their shipments/bombs from doggie detection with just one quick application of Febreeze!

  2. Well, why should cold meds and strike-anywhere matches be the only household objects of governmental control?
    Perhaps when housewives have to register to buy the things THEY want and it can’t be argued that only baddies want the stuff, they will begin to recognize the costs of a “damn the expense, total security now” policy in government.

  3. Well, why should cold meds and strike-anywhere matches be the only household objects of governmental control?
    Perhaps when housewives have to register to buy the things THEY want and it can’t be argued that only baddies want the stuff, they will begin to recognize the costs of a “damn the expense, total security now” policy in government.

  4. Seems like the predator hunting crowd found this a while back. They mix a whole bunch of urines and other stuff together, and it seems to create an odor that confuses the predator, (mostly used against coyotes). Although they obviously smell something, they don’t freak like they would upon smelling a human on the downwind side. There seems to be a disagreement about why it works, with some of the belief that it simply arouses their curiosity, while others wonder if if just creates so much havoc that they can’t sort it all out.

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