Quote of the day—Ahmad Ibsais

The NRA often accuses Democrats of trying to abridge Americans’ Second Amendment rights. Nevertheless, Democrats should be united on a comprehensive plan to remove semiautomatic weapons from the streets.

Ahmad Ibsais
March 14, 2020
What we need to hear from Biden and Sanders on guns
[No thought is given to the obvious infringement of the rights of 100 million or more people.

The politicians and their supporters who work to implement such policies need to be prosecuted.—Joe]

No. It’s just the big lie thing again

Via American by Choice @Q_undivided:

RussianAgentVsCommunist

There is a certain amount of truth to that. But it mostly applies to the useful idiots. The high level people know better. They will say anything they think will help them achieve power. It’s just the thing about telling a big lie often enough and people will believe it.

Quote of the day—RyanSepe

All this awareness would make us liable. Without them its ignorance, if we hire them it becomes negligence and I prefer ignorance.

RyanSepe
February 28, 2020
Suggested caption to this cartoon:


[There is way too much truth in this.

Companies have finite resources. They have to prioritize their cyber security efforts. If something is documented as an active issue, or even a potential weakness, and they don’t address it in a timely manner they have legal liability issues to deal with as well as fixing the problem.

In the “big picture” view of things companies have a lot of motivation to “not put it in writing” until they have the resources to deal with it. On the other hand, if managers don’t show they have a backlog and are overworked they aren’t going to get the resources to fix things in a timely manner. I have more than a little sympathy for cyber security managers caught in this dilemma.

After illegal computer access incidents have been made public Barb sometimes tells me, “I wish they would just stop doing that!” I would be out of a job, but the world would be a better place. So much money is spent on security that from a big picture you see it as huge waste of human and even natural resources (millions of computers monitor and guard against intrusion as their sole purpose). Even when the criminals are caught (extremely rare) they will never have to pay for all the resources spent in finding them and bringing them to justice.

And, of course, it’s never going to happen. Some of these criminals do it for the “free” money. Others do it for the thrill. And some do because they are spies in search of information useful to their country. There are always going to be those type of people. The best we can do is find them, stop them, and prosecute them if we can build a case against them.—Joe]

Boomershoot 2020 speaker: Kim du Toit

Kim du Toit is attending Boomershoot again this year and he has agreed to be our Saturday night dinner speaker.

I believe the last time he and his son were here was 2005.

Anyone who has spent more than a few seconds around Kim knows he is a rather “colorful” character. His personality fills the room.

He’s publicly called me both “Paparazzi Bastard“ as well as a “National Treasure“. Those blog posts of his are gone but I haven’t forgotten.

I wonder what colorful language he will use this year. Attend Boomershoot dinner and find out.

Quote of the day—Coalition to Stop Gun Violence

Joe Biden has repeatedly stood up to and defeated the National Rifle Association (NRA) and the corrupt gun lobby. As a senator, he helped pass the Brady Background Check Bill and enact the Assault Weapons Ban. He authored the Violence Against Women Act that has served as a guiding light in America’s effort to disarm domestic abusers and protect the lives of women. As vice president to President Barack Obama, Biden helped lead the effort to enact stronger gun laws through executive actions following the tragic massacre in Newtown, Connecticut in 2012.

As president, Joe Biden will fight for a safer and more secure United States of America. With 40,000 gun deaths each year, we are facing a public health crisis. His comprehensive gun violence prevention plan includes addressing the scourge of gun violence that wreaks havoc in communities across our country. He will enact policies that address and reduce the tragedy of firearm suicide, and he will continue to fight for laws that disarm domestic abusers and stalkers. His plan also includes incentivizing life-saving permit-to-purchase programs in states and creating buyback programs to get weapons of war off of America’s streets.

Coalition to Stop Gun Violence
Coalition to Stop Gun Violence Endorses Joe Biden for President of the United States
March 10, 2020
[Emphasis added.

Don’t ever let anyone get away with telling you that no one wants to take your guns.

Just in case you were considering Biden for President, that the CSGV endorses him should be sufficient to dissuade you.

Remember, some people believe there is a “epidemic” or “public health crisis” exemption to the Bill of Rights. Or at least that is the rational they give. I’m pretty sure they are just saying that to hide their hatred of individual rights.

Biden is clearly one of those people. He says that if you believe the Second Amendment protects your right to own anything other than a shotgun then, “You’re full of shit.

Don’t let him get into office.—Joe]

Quote of the day—Anthony Smith

No, Voting is NOT the Answer.

Are Your RIGHTS Up for a VOTE?

Anthony Smith
2A Productions
March 9, 2020
YouTube Video

[Via JPFO new alert.

Elaboration here.

This reminds me something I have said before:

Some questions don’t make sense in a free society.

Just say, NO!

molṑn labé.—Joe]

Quote of the day—John Hood

The federal government has lost its proper moorings to its founding document, and that the Framers of the Constitution would be horrified at much of what is even being debated in Washington, D.C. these days (quite apart from which side in the debate they might, upon reflection, endorse).

North Carolinians should take the lead in this important cause. We are (or used to be) “First in Freedom” for a very good reason. We used to be the cantankerous old coot at the constitutional garden party. It’s time we became him once more.

John Hood
March 9, 2020
Let’s spoil the garden party
[It really is a states issue to bring the Feds back in line with the Constitution. But it’s going to take more than one state to do it. I wouldn’t be surprised if it requires a constitutional convention of the states. And that gets us into scary territory.

The second best approach I see is the sanctuary movement and related activities. Just look at what’s happening with legalization of marijuana. It’s still against Federal law but so many states are ignoring the Feds and businesses in those states are getting away with it. When will this start happening with suppressors, machine guns, 4473’s, and NICS checks? Or even W-2’s, 1099’s, and 1040s?—Joe]

COVID-19 exemption to the Bill of Rights

Via email from Jason.

Apparently there is a COVID-19 exemption to the Bill of Rights. At least a judge found one. I just looked at my copy of the BoR and didn’t find it. But I guess Federal Judges just have better eyesight than I do. Here is what he said:

Given the significant number of identified and projected cases of COVID-19 in this
District and the severity of risk posed to the public, and given the above public health
recommendations from local public health authorities, it is hereby ORDERED that, effective
Monday, March 9, 2020:

1) All civil and criminal matters scheduled for an in-Court appearance before any district or magistrate judge in the Seattle or Tacoma Courthouses, including any associated
deadlines, are CONTINUED pending further Order of the Court;

2) All grand jury proceedings in this District are CONTINUED pending further Order of the Court;

3) With regard to criminal matters, due to the Court’s reduced ability to obtain an adequate spectrum of jurors and the effect of the above public health
recommendations on the availability of counsel and Court staff to be present in the
courtroom, the time period of the continuances implemented by this General Order
will be excluded under the Speedy Trial Act, as the Court specifically finds that the
ends of justice served by ordering the continuances outweigh the best interests of the public and any defendant’s right to a speedy trial, pursuant to 18 U.S.C.
§3161(h)(7)(A);

4) Case-by-case exceptions to the continuances provided herein may be ordered for nonjury matters at the discretion of the Court after consultation with counsel;

5) This Order does not affect the Court’s consideration of civil or criminal motions that can be resolved without oral argument.

Here is the clause in Federal Law he refers to:

A) Any period of delay resulting from a continuance granted by any judge on his own motion or at the request of the defendant or his counsel or at the request of the attorney for the Government, if the judge granted such continuance on the basis of his findings that the ends of justice served by taking such action outweigh the best interest of the public and the defendant in a speedy trial. No such period of delay resulting from a continuance granted by the court in accordance with this paragraph shall be excludable under this subsection unless the court sets forth, in the record of the case, either orally or in writing, its reasons for finding that the ends of justice served by the granting of such continuance outweigh the best interests of the public and the defendant in a speedy trial.

I understand the practical matters involved. And I’m not sure I disagree with the action taken. But it does worry me that such precedence will be misused in the future.

How many times have we heard about “The Gun Violence Epidemic”?

Fill in the dots as appropriate.

Quote of the day—anon

She demonstrates total ignorance and admits complete incomprehension of the subject and its complexity, and then demands we listen to her and take action on the topic.

anon
March 9, 2020
Comment to Quote of the day—Lori Haas
[Excellent point.

The arrogance, as pointed out by Lyle, is very telling.

I have my doubts about the severity of the suggested punishment, but that is a concern for her judge and jury a later date.—Joe]

Mandatory “social distancing”?

Hmmm…

Gov. Inslee says ‘mandatory measures’ under consideration to combat coronavirus in Washington

Since the novel coronavirus emerged as a threat in Washington, officials have sought to keep people here from infecting each other by offering advice, health care and other assistance. What they haven’t yet done to slow the spread of the virus is tell residents what they can and can’t do.

That could change at some point, however.

Officials are considering mandatory measures for social distancing as part of the state’s effort to combat the outbreak, Gov. Jay Inslee said Sunday.

Barb, my oldest daughter, her spouse, and I, all in Bellevue, have been doing our part for the last week. We have been working from home and minimizing contact outside our homes. We are also prepared for several more weeks as needed.

We live in interesting times.

Quote of the day—Lori Haas

I just could not understand why people cared so much about a piece of hardware and the inconvenience of a small segment of our population taking priority over saving lives. I just found that inexplicable.

Lori Haas
March 8, 2020
Not going away: Virginia Tech families fight for gun control
[Wow! She is totally clueless and/or totally evil.

And notice that it’s one of those fractally wrong statements. There are at least three false item in just that first sentence.

This is what they think of you and the specific enumerated right to keep and bear arms.—Joe]

Quote of the day—Widener’s Blog

Cooper understood that legislating guns away from the public was only a small part of the problem. The larger issue was a false social construct. One that was intent on disarming the populace of reason and will, of the mindset to act when necessary. He was not just talking about the direct attack of a mugger, but the steady erosion of “society” through the demand of conformity in defenselessness. Whether it be against criminals on the street or those in the capitol. Small wonder his copious quotes are often questioned by those who refuse to understand the virtues of violence.

Widener’s Blog
March 5, 2020
Historic Profile: Jeff Cooper
[Reading his profile made me miss him again.—Joe]

Pushing the limits

I like pushing the limits in certain directions.

Recently I have been spending nearly every waking hour working on my Bird Dog software for work.* I’m dealing with information on billions of network connections. I extract the stuff of interest and present it in an way which makes it easier to find the wood slivers in the hay stack. After using all the algorithmic tricks available I started finding places to do more parallel processing.

It was with great satisfaction that I found that I pretty much continuously keep all eight logical processers at 100 percent when doing certain tasks:

Limits

Each one of those processors is over 1000 times more powerful than the single processer I had on my first personal computer. And just the Bird Dog executable would take up over 75% of the hard disk space on that computer. Never mind the O/S or the database software which wouldn’t fit on a dozen hard disks I was so proud of at the time I first purchased it. “I’ll never run out of room on this disk!”, I foolishly told myself.

I now routinely open up text files in Vim for review and/or editing that are 50 to 100 times larger than what that hard disk could contain.

I like living in the future.


* I received an email from the company patent team earlier this week. They told me they are pursuing a patent on Bird Dog. I think the existing invention disclosure is okay, but the next one will be AWESOME! I’m really excited about what is coming up next. It’s as if a decade or more of my life’s work is coming to a focus on this one thing. I’ll probably need a more powerful computer, or set of computers, though.

Quote of the day—Justice Gorsuch

The executive branch and affected citizens asked the court to do what courts usually do in statutory interpretation disputes: supply its best independent judgment about what the law means. But, instead of deciding the case the old-fashioned way, the court placed an uninvited thumb on the scale in favor of the government.

That was mistaken.

Despite these concerns, I agree with my colleagues that the interlocutory petition before us does not merit review. The errors apparent in this preliminary ruling might yet be corrected before final judgment. Further, other courts of appeals are actively considering challenges to the same regulation. Before deciding whether to weigh in, we would benefit from hearing their considered judgments—provided, of course, that they are not afflicted with the same problems. But waiting should not be mistaken for lack of concern.

Justice Gorsuch
SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES
DAMIEN GUEDES, ET AL. v. BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS AND EXPLOSIVES, ET AL. ON PETITION FOR WRIT OF CERTIORARI TO THE UNITED STATES COURT OF APPEALS FOR THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA CIRCUIT No. 19–296. Decided March 2, 2020
[I have never owned a bump stock and almost for certain never will. For long distance work a bolt gun serves my needs best. For close up work aimed fire from a semi-auto appears to be optimal.

As near as I can tell a bump stock is best suited for converting money into noise. While I can understand that could be a reasonable use of someone else’s money it’s generally not something I want to do with my money.

That said, just because I don’t anticipate the use of one for myself I regard the ban on bump stocks to be extremely concerning. The law quite clearly does not forbid the ownership or use of a bump stock. Yet the administration insisted the law means something entirely different from what it says. This sort of behavior is not acceptable.

While there is still a decent chance SCOTUS will correct the mistake it is important to note that a right delayed is a right denied.

If it were up to me the court will slap the administration down so hard their ears ring as if they had a dozen bump stock equipped rifles emptying 100 round magazines simultaneously near their unprotected ears. Then I would recommended them for prosecution under 18 USC 242 and tell them, Enjoy. Your. Trial.—Joe]

Working from home

Health officials in King County (Seattle area) are recommending, among other things:

Workplaces should enact measures that allow people who can work from home to do so.

About 5:00 PM on Wednesday a blog reader told me::

Microsoft just told all employees who can WFH to do so until March 25

My employer said something similar yesterday. My team started WFH the day before that.

I can work from home for almost everything except meetings where someone is likely to be using a real whiteboard (we have virtual whiteboards in some conference rooms).

My first thought was, “Will the VPNs fall over?” So far both my MS contact and I have had not had any problems with our Internet connections to work. I suspect they have self-scaling VPNs.

Barb has been working from home exclusively for years now. It’s a little odd for both of us to be working from home every day. It’s nice but it just feels a little odd to only see each other for such extended periods. I wonder how it will feel after three weeks.

Yesterday I asked Barb if we are going to get “cabin fever” and get irritable or something. She thinks she will be okay as long as she doesn’t feel physically trapped as in being snowed in or something.

We’ll probably will go for walks occasionally. That should help and it should be safe as long as we don’t have contact with other people.

Quote of the day—Stephen Gutowski

Gun sales soared in Virginia as Democrats passed several new gun-control measures during February, according to an industry report.

Nearly 66,000 background checks were performed in Virginia in February as the state’s Democratic-controlled legislature weighs a number of strict background checks—a steep increase from the 40,381 checks performed in February 2019. Virginia experienced one of the most dramatic upticks in background checks—a strong indicator of total sales—in the nation, according to data released by the National Shooting Sports Foundation (NSSF). Gun sales are up nationwide with average growth rates of 16.7 percent, according to the report, but the surge was especially dramatic in Virginia where checks rose by 63.4 percent compared to 2019.

The spike in Virginia gun sales, which have increased for four consecutive months, shows that guns remain at the forefront of many residents’ minds.

Stephen Gutowski
March 5, 2020
Virginia Gun Sales Surge as Dems Pass Gun Control — Monthly sales up 60 percent from 2019
[If the anti-gun people were data driven and really believed “there are too many guns in the hands of private citizens” their behavior would be just the opposite of what they have been doing for decades. This is just one more datum demonstrating the error of their ways.

Spelling it out for them:

Every time there is serious talk, or the actually passage , of a law increasing the restrictions on the specific enumerated right to keep and bear arm the sales of firearms increase.

This was true during the Clinton administration and passage of the Brady Bill and the “assault weapon” ban.

This was true during the Obama administration and their frequent attempts to increase restrictions.

This was true in the fall of 2016 when it appeared Hillary Clinton was going to win the presidency and increase restrictions on gun ownership.

Increasing restrictions on guns cause people to buy guns!

The rate of sales would decrease if restrictions were to decrease because people would think they could always get a gun later if they really needed one.

One has to conclude they are not data driven and/or they don’t really want a decrease in the total number of guns in circulation.—Joe]