Quote of the day—Rescued Goddaughter‏ @XianCorleone

Americans, I’m watching the #GunControl protests from Italy. Take a European’s advice:

Last century our governments disarmed us. Now, in Germany & the UK they arrest you for Twitter & FB posts.

Lesson?

If the gov’t takes your 2nd Amendment, one day it’ll take your 1st.

Rescued Goddaughter‏ @XianCorleone
Tweeted on March 26, 2018
[My understanding is that term “Politically Correct” speech fully bloomed into usage during the Stalinist era in the USSR. You could be arrested and set to the gulag and/or executed if you were too careless in what you said. Read The Gulag Archipelago, 1918-1956: An Experiment in Literary Investigation (Volume One) for a taste of what went on there. They murdered millions of people because of “politically correctness” ran amok.

People are being arrested and prosecuted in Europe but we are not far behind. There are lots of people who have lost their jobs for not adhering to the politically correct rules of the day.

My model for what happens is that the power to punish people attracts a certain type of person. The type of person who should never be allowed to have such power. When groups of those people get together they convince themselves they are doing good and find more people to punish. They get themselves worked up into a feeding frenzy and justify their escalation of punishment and the decrease in the seriousness of the offense which satisfies their criteria for punishment. Left unchecked they will execute the majority of a town and a sizable percentage of an entire country.

Read The Gulag Archipelago to see how it happened in the USSR. Look in the news to see the beginnings of it happening all around us now.

Own firearms, get trained, and practice with them to nip genocide in the bud when it escalates to the lethal level.—Joe]

10 thoughts on “Quote of the day—Rescued Goddaughter‏ @XianCorleone

  1. Always remember that Europe doesn’t have a 1st Amendment in the first place (nor a 2nd). Some countries have constitutions, some don’t, some have fake ones (like Holland). But all of them have unlimited governments.
    The USA is rare, perhaps unique, in having at least nominally a limited government. The reality is a very poor approximation of the letter of the supreme law, but at least that supreme law exists and is occasionally invoked to put an end to the government’s most outrageous abuses. No such limits exist in Europe.

  2. I’ve read The Gulag Archipelago. Another book, which was somehow more disturbing is “The Forsaken”, by Tim Tzouliadis. His focus is on Americans who went to the USSR in the depths of the Depression in search of a better life, only to find that in the Soviet Union their lives and even their bodies were an asset owned by the government to be used, abused, and squandered by the bureaucrats. Quite disturbing and worth reading, even as you wonder how Americans could have given up on America so early in the Progressive’s Long March through the culture and economy. It’s worth remembering that the evils of Stalin and Lenin before him did not start to come out until after Stalin died, culminating in The Gulag Archipelago and ultimately in the end-game of
    Glastnost.

    • “…wonder how Americans could have given up on America so early in the Progressive’s Long March through the culture and economy.”

      Culture being media, education, art, entertainment, economy, science, industry and religion. Yup; Americans gave up America’s principles back around 1900 or certainly by 1913.

      It’s a done deal, as the vast majority of “conservatives” would side with the Progressives against you if you were to come out, with some real effect, in favor of the founding principles.

      Trying to warn the leftists about the problems they’re creating is a bit like trying to warn a bank robber that what he’s doing is against the law.

      “Have no fellowship with the unfruitful worls of darkness, but rather expose them.” — Ephesians 5:11. I take that as a marching order.

  3. You’d think that the Germans would understand the danger of arresting people for thoughtcrime.
    Can Schutzhaft (arrest for protective custody) be far behind?

    • There are probably very few of those Germans left; today’s German is the grandchild of those who survived the gentle ministrations of LeMay, Harris and Eisenhower so there’s no direct experience with application of the kind of state authority to which you refer.

      For some reason, it requires actual, direct experience with such state malfeasance to develop opposition to it; no other educational method seems to reliably work. A few days with Solzhenitsyn would, one thinks, be a decent prophylactic but alas, it’s longer than 280 characters and possesses not a single emoticon.

      And, there are those who consider such activities a feature, the foundational reason for our beloved and necessary 2nd in the first place.

      • You’re probably right. I recall that into the seventies businessmen negotiating with unions over pay could get the unions to reduce demands by saying, “This will bring back inflation”, referring of course to the destructive hyper-inflation of the early twenties when no one wanted Marks at all.

  4. I would say make it required reading except half the population would regard it as a “How to” manual.

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