Quote of the day—Barb L.

You don’t get to be your own museum.

Barb L.
September 15, 2013
[I moved to a new clock tower today. I now have a clear field of fire into the lawns of homes over a mile away. It’s awesome!

I sorted through dozens of old boxes of stuff. Some of them contained stuff from 40 years ago. I’m a packrat and it’s difficult to let go of things. But I threw out garbage bag after garbage bag of stuff.

There were some things I had received from Microsoft that I considered historic. I help build Direct X and Windows Phone 7. I participated in the attempt at worlds record for the largest number of paper airplanes in flight at the same time and have one of the airplanes.

When I came across an artifact from the launch of Windows Phone Seven I wanted to pack it for the move. Barb was there and said to throw it. I started to explain how it was from the launch but she interrupted me with the above quote.

My response was:
WP_20130915_004Cropped

Picture by Barb.–Joe]

4 thoughts on “Quote of the day—Barb L.

  1. I understand.

    I have found over the years that sometimes to go forward in life you must let go of the past, even if it may be painful!

    Good Luck in your new future.

  2. For years I have tried to be my own museum. My father was a charter member of the original Sons of Thrift, and I’m sure my mother formed the first Women’s auxiliary chapter. I’ve given that up, lest like Guam in Hank Johnson’s mind, my home should tip over from the weight of all that stuff.
    Fortunately there is a local museum that has been taking (happily for the most part) everything I can find that has any demonstrable connection to the city and its history. My rule is it has to have some sort of connection to me to save it, and it has to “speak” to me.
    Good luck in your task, and remember, men need some souvenirs.

  3. Oh, and are there no Microsoft museums who might want some of the stuff you don’t want? The local museum was enormously grateful for four or five retired Aerospace Engineers whose garages enabled them to have a really big and really thorough permanent exhibit of that Aerospace company’s history.

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