Quote of the day—Alan Gottlieb

The man is obsessed and if he’s spent so much as a dime of public money on what amounts to a private crusade, Mayor Bloomberg needs to be held accountable for that.

If Eric Schneiderman won’t investigate Bloomberg for possible misuse of public funds we will. The mayor has been acting increasingly like a self-appointed monarch, but this still the United States, not Bloomberg’s personal fiefdom.

Alan Gottlieb
June 26, 2013
SAF ASKS FOR ALL BLOOMBERG-MAIG RECORDS FROM NYC AFTER REVELATIONS
[Bloomberg is like some proslavery politician in the mid-1800’s obsessed with the “problem” that there are states that are free. He wants all states and cities to put “people in their place”.

Bloomberg needs to be put in his place and it if takes lawsuits, courts, and Federal Marshalls hauling him off to jail I’m just fine with that.—Joe]

4 thoughts on “Quote of the day—Alan Gottlieb

  1. There seems to be a Backlash against Bloomberg’s Nanny-State Imperialism taking place. Even the DemaCommie NYC City Council has decided to override some of his Pet Policies in the last few days, ands there seems to more Legal Trouble ahead with his “Stop and Frisk” policy and his Domestic Terrorism Spying Operation.

    SCHADENFREUDE!

  2. I do not know the intricacies of any mayor’s use of city funds for activities, but I cannot see how this does not violate some policies, and probably some laws.

    This is the terrible idea, on mega-steroids, that tangential, unfunded, and not mandated activities can be justifiably used to help a city.

    By this criteria, anything is permissible. Just misappropriate the funds and go on a mission to end world hunger.

    Heck, funds could be used for NYC to launch a satellite to look for incoming asteroids because NYC could be hit.

    Where does the prerogative end for the mayor to conduct business on his terms and responsible fiscal stewardship and focus on the city begin?

  3. It’s really not much of a stretch for all his activities to fall under 18 USC 241 (Conspiracy Against Rights). Given the typical typical definition of a ‘felony’ being a crime for which a prison term of greater than one year *is possible*, that would make him a felon (if convicted).

    • He still wouldn’t lose his MAIG membership. Having a conviction simply moves you up to the next membership level, complete with secret decoder ring and front-lot parking at the zoo.

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