Quote of the day–Maximilien François Marie Isidore de Robespierre

If virtue be the spring of a popular government in times of peace, the spring of that government during a revolution is virtue combined with terror: virtue, without which terror is destructive; terror, without which virtue is impotent. Terror is only justice prompt, severe and inflexible; it is then an emanation of virtue; it is less a distinct principle than a natural consequence of the general principle of democracy, applied to the most pressing wants of the country … The government in a revolution is the despotism of liberty against tyranny.

Maximilien François Marie Isidore de Robespierre
February 5, 1794
Report on the Principles of Political Morality
[Via Bill Whittle:

Via Kevin Baker’s The Slaughter isn’t a Bug, It’s a Feature.

Read that again:

Terror is only justice prompt, severe and inflexible; it is then an emanation of virtue; it is less a distinct principle than a natural consequence of the general principle of democracy, applied to the most pressing wants of the country.

That is what emanates as a natural consequence from those that believe if only the 1% (or 10% as President Obama’s good friend Bill Ayers believed) were responsible for the problems of the rest of the population were “taken care of” utopia could be achieved. The method for dealing with these “troublemakers”, as Whittle above points out, is frequently the murder of tens of millions of people. And as Kevin points out, this is a “feature” not a “bug” in the mind of the self-anointed.

And that is Why Boomershoot.—Joe]

1 thought on “Quote of the day–Maximilien François Marie Isidore de Robespierre

  1. Excellent post.

    The priest and the rabbi would point out that the Judeo-Christian philosophy identifying us all as sinners would be similar to Sowell’s Constrained Vision I suppose. I haven’t gotten through Sowell’s book, so I don’t know whether he made the same point.

    “The Cultivated Mind”. Blech. You know, I actually fell for that hateful nonsense in my youth. It’s been taught in our universities for generations and I, like millions of others, was never exposed to the other side. And who would be the farmers, verses the farmed and the culled? What many of the current Occupy movement fail to understand, among other things, is that they’d be among the weeded, as soon as their usefulness ended.

    I like the post, with Whittle’s video, because it contrasts what we are against and what we are for, though I don’t know that I’d have picked Disneyland as the prime example of what’s good about limited government.

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