Quote of the day—NRA-ILA

Sporting events involving automatic firearms are similar to those events such as silhouette shooting and other target-related endeavors and deserve the same respect and support.

NRA-ILA
NRA to Fight Machine Gun Ban
Monitor, Vol. 13, No. 13, (August 15, 1986), p. 3.
The Monitor was a publication of the National Rifle Association’s Institute for Legislative Action.
[We still have a way to go before the NRA and other gun rights organizations can start working on support for fully automatic weapons. But people should not think the NRA kicked them to the curb without a second thought.

For more background on the situation behind the scenes at the NRA at the time see Neal Knox – The Gun Rights War.—Joe]

5 thoughts on “Quote of the day—NRA-ILA

  1. We’ll be talking with them at SHOW Show as we just secured a local range to run subgun matches at…I guess we’ll see just how supportive they are. We have a VERY solid group of Range Officers and guys with lots of experience (we ran matches for 13 years at another range in the past, stopping in 2003), it should be fun!

  2. We’ll be talking with them at SHOW Show as we just secured a local range to run subgun matches at…I guess we’ll see just how supportive they are. We have a VERY solid group of Range Officers and guys with lots of experience (we ran matches for 13 years at another range in the past, stopping in 2003), it should be fun!

  3. I don’t remember any full-auto sporting events in the mid-eighties, but then again, I can’t find a “recognized sporting event clause” in the Bill of Rights.

    I do wish that those in D.C. cared about my hearing. A six month waiting period, plus more than $200 in taxes in fees, is a draconian penalty for those who want to protect their hearing.

  4. It is difficult if not impossible to find reference to the now defunct National Firearms Association or NFA (no relation to the Canadian anti-long gun registration group) as they folded before the internet came into really popular usage, but they were the national organization that standardized the rules for subgun matches. Until about a year ago, Knob Creek Range used to state that their subgun shoots were run “according to NFA rules” but they stopped because most people do not even remember the NFA and assumed they were referencing the National Firearms ACT (KCR’s posted rules are a VERY simplified subset of the NFA Rule Book.) The only reference I can find online are to the 1997 rule book and range officers training manuals held by the Library of Congress (http://www.worldcat.org/title/official-rules-for-nfa-submachine-gun-competitions-4-july-1997/oclc/46808887&referer=brief_results) even though there are several earlier iterations. Some of my close friends started Pennsylvania Class Three Competitors (PC3C) to manage state level matches and we are basically rebooting PC3C using the 1997 NFA rule book as our starting point. We’re going to run a modest 4 shoot season and the club we’re at also talked us into running one 3-gun match. The book “Machine Gun Buyer’s Guide and Owner’s Manual” by Frank Iannamico contains a number of photos marked “Courtesy of PC3C” and has references to our subgun matches.

    Which reminds me, I need to ask Joe if he’s had any luck sensitizing boomers to work with pistol calibers…I’d love to have the occasional small ‘splode in a stage!

    P.S – I did just locate a reference to the old NFA by adding the name “Colonel John Butterfield” who was the President of the organization, check (http://www.bullethose.com/forums/viewtopic.php?p=829#p829) near the end of the post linked.

Comments are closed.