Photographic proof

I received a Tweet from thumper242 requesting:

Can we get photographic proof of how ridiculous the temperature is in the Republic of Northern Idaho?

Here are some samples from the Boomershoot site last weekend. Click on them to see a higher resolution version:

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The bush nearest the road at the tree line.

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Looking north from just south of the creek.

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The hillside we shoot into.

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The Taj Mahal.

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The top of the Wi-Fi antenna from a different angle.

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The concrete blocks we use to put the tables on when manufacturing targets.

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The snow in front of the Taj. Somehow my pictures just don’t capture how sharp, sparkly, and beautiful it was.

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I dropped the plastic pitcher we use for scooping the ammonium nitrate onto the concrete floor. It fractured.

6 thoughts on “Photographic proof

  1. As I read this, from 100 or so miles north of you, at 1:34 in the morning; it’s about 2 degrees outside, with a good 10 knot breeze blowing. Supposed to hit maybe 2 below later in the morning

    I believe brisk would be a good word for that.

    It’s not really “cold” cold til you hit 10 below after all.. unless the windchill is bad.

  2. “Somehow my pictures just don’t capture how sharp, sparkly, and beautiful it was.”

    I agree–that kind of snow can be very beautiful!

    I can’t tell you how many times I wish my camera would just capture the things I see just as I see them. It seems that if pictures aren’t too dark, they’re washed out by flash, among other things. I’m sure there’s technological reasons why this doesn’t happen, but I wish I had the time and the resources to hunt down those reasons and correct them.

  3. Alan,

    If someone dropped me off in Texas I give serious consideration to walking back to Idaho just for the snow. Different strokes and all…

    Chris,

    Yeah. It wasn’t all that cold that day. It was about 15 F when we were there with nearly zero wind. The Sandpoint area is generally quite a bit colder but I have seen periods of up to a week of -30 F weather on the farm. And about 10 or 15 years ago it never got above 0 F for a full month.

    For Boomershoot issues the colder weather just means access to our equiment and chemicals is difficult and some tests would be invalid.

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