National Ammo Day in the news

Today is the day (happy birthday to Kim du Toit) to buy some ammo and I just heard it on the radio news because the Seattle PI mentioned it:

Seattle resident Chris Pierce had left Butch’s Gun Shop on Sunday and was heading for the countryside in North Bend to fire rounds when he heard about National Ammo Day.

“I think it’s a great idea. It sends the message that firearms aren’t going away,” he said. “You can’t take out one part of the Constitution without ruining all of it.”

The thought of Monday as National Ammo Day, a period dedicated to buying bullets to support the Second Amendment, might send shivers down the backs of some Seattle residents.

But they are careful to get other opinions on the topic:

While many gun owners are preparing to part with their cash, a Washington CeaseFire spokeswoman said the day should have a different emphasis.

“As we approach Thanksgiving, we would better benefit from responsible firearms owners reminding the public of the importance of safe firearm storage,” group executive director Kristen Comer said.

“The safest place for firearms … is locked and out of reach of children and others who might otherwise place themselves in danger.”

She said she believes responsible gun owners are not in jeopardy of losing access to firearms and bullets.

A spokesman for the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives in Seattle said his agency has no position on National Ammo Day.

And you just know what question was asked and the mindset behind it that prompted this response:

To mark it, Taff plans to buy 100 rounds and fire them at a Bellevue range.

While Monday marks the sixth annual National Ammo Day, Taff heard about it only recently.

He was not concerned that criminals would use the day to clear ammunition shelves and then commit robberies.

1 thought on “National Ammo Day in the news

  1. “”The safest place for firearms … is locked and out of reach of children and others who might otherwise place themselves in danger.””

    Right, like we need some anti-gun, anti-Bill of Rights activist to tell us how to handle firearms. We absolutely do not. If you want real information and skills, go to an NRA affiliated class or one of the many serious gun schools out there.

    Next we’ll be having PETA member vegans telling us how to hunt and butcher animals, and how to prepare gourmet meat dishes. Next we’ll have the Amish teaching us how to build race cars, program computers, and fly jet airplanes. Then we can take some classes in brewing and bartending from the teetotalers.

    “She said she believes responsible gun owners are not in jeopardy of losing access to firearms and bullets.”

    Try telling that to a Washington DC resident. And where we do still have limited access to some firearms, it is precisely because the best efforts of groups like CeaseFire have failed. But maybe we have to parse her words, Clinton-style: “We’re not in jeopardy of losing [legal] access to firearms…” (Once banned, you see, we’ll have to get our guns and ammo from the Mob.) Or maybe she means that the only “responsible gun owners” are police and government agents. Unfortunately, this is how we have to analyze these people’s language. They’ll never say anything straight-out and honest, so you’re always left wondering.

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